Archive for the career switcher Category

Financing a Second Career

Posted in career switcher, marketing on July 19, 2007 by keronii

There are plenty of reasons to think about a career change. Boredom, desire for new challenges, lack of advancement options, or a downturn in your industry or your field are some of the top ones. It could be as simple as your desire to—and the belief that you can—make more money. Perhaps you’ve just become intrigued with the idea of working in a completely different field and want to give it a try.

Regardless of why you want to make a switch, a big factor in whether you’ll be successful in your new career is how you plan for and deal with the inevitable financial changes. In your enthusiasm to shift gears, don’t make a leap until you’re sure you understand both the short- and long-term financial implications and are sure that you and your family will have adequate financial protection.

Here’s a four-step approach that could help you make a good decision: Consider the expenses involved in a career change; research the potential financial rewards of the change; review your current financial situation, including income and job benefits; and finally, compare the results. Ultimately, you’ll have to make your decision based on both your financial wherewithal and your psychological resources for dealing with any financial risks that may come with the change.

Continue reading

If you’re looking to “recareer,” knowing the ins and outs of exploratory interviewing is a must

Posted in career switcher on July 19, 2007 by keronii

Baby boomers pursuing environmental or personal interests after retirement, executives fleeing downsizing companies, and restless upstarts pushing for higher pay all have one thing in common: They are part of a trend of professionals starting second careers, a trend that recruiters and coaches now call “recareering.”

As companies struggle to retain talent and career changers chart unfamiliar territory, recareering is often facilitated through a series of informational or exploratory interviews. Loosely defined and malleable enough to fit a job seeker’s desired profession as well as his or her unique circumstances, informational interviews can be as informal as trading contact information at a barbecue or as formal as lengthy office meetings that result in a job offer.

Continue reading

Network Your Way to a Second Career

Posted in career switcher on July 19, 2007 by keronii

Gaining knowledge, networking with those currently in your e-mail list, and tapping new resources—combined, these elements pave the way to a second career

Career-changers who have been in the workforce for 10 to 15 years have an important asset when it comes to moving to greener pastures—namely, their personal and professional networks. But as a would-be second-career launcher reviews his or her contacts database—whether that’s an Outlook (MSFT) address book, a list of contacts on LinkedIn, or an old-fashioned Rolodex—they may find that almost everyone they know works in the same industry. That’s not unusual, but it can present a daunting hurdle to a professional seeking to launch a second career. How, after all, do you move into a new arena when everyone you know is here with you in the old one?

Continue reading

Your Brilliant Second Career

Posted in career switcher on July 19, 2007 by keronii

Your work experience makes you a valuable commodity. Figure out how you want to parlay it into a new career for yourself

have always wondered how a kid in his second year of college is supposed to pick a major and then, a couple of years later, dive into a career. At that stage in life, most folks know almost nothing about the range of careers that are available and have so little life experience. It’s no wonder that, in survey after survey, midcareer professionals report that they “fell into” their areas of specialization. Few, if any, of us, after all, have childhood dreams of becoming a procurement manager, a process engineer, or a human resources information systems analyst. And yet, here we are.

Continue reading

10 Tips for Informational Interviews

Posted in career switcher on July 19, 2007 by keronii

1. Use your network

It distinguishes you from entry-level job seekers and makes employers take you seriously. “I think if you don’t have any contacts, cold call,” says Laura Gassner Otting, author of Transitioning to the Nonprofit Sector: Shifting Your Focus from the Bottom Line to a Better World. “But I’d say if you don’t think you have any contacts, you probably haven’t looked hard enough.”

Continue reading